Tag Archives: Breeze

Top New Tunes of the Summer

I haven’t introduced you to some new tunes for a while, totally missing July in the whirlwind that the month was. So, here’s a slightly longer version of my ‘Top New Tunes’ looking at those artists who are releasing new material over the summer. Artists you may be checking out at the festivals, or ones who could get you in the right mood while packing your backpack.

First up is Leeds-based Masses with their new single ‘In Circles’. Having a countdown on Facebook, I found myself subconsciously anticipating this track, to which the video was unleashed on August 2nd.

Masses have a really enjoyable rock sound, and this track showcases the Cain Cookson’s charming voice. Soft at the beginning, within the chorus it picks up, making it ever more catchy.  It reminds me of the early Matchbox Twenty sound, a pure rock sound which captures emotion seemingly effortlessly.

Another catchy tune, this time from a Hull band and from a different genre. ‘Behind These Eyes’ is the first track to feature on Three Day Millionaires’ self-titled EP, released last month.

A punk rock band, they cross over into the metal sound with heavy ruthless vocals. I’m not usually one for scream-come-singing, but recently I’ve been increasingly intrigued by the metal genre. I dallied with it somewhat in my teenage years (I dated a guy in a death metal band and had an episode of listening to a lot of Children of Bodom). Now, I’m finding myself drawn to more and more local Metal bands.

This track features some very catchy parts – the parts you can make out on the first time of listening to it – as well as some parts where I imagine I’d be moving too much to sing along to anyway. I can certainly picture myself on the outskirts of a circle pit of true metal fans, enjoying this band, even if it’s not my usual choice of noise.

You can get your hands on their music via their Bandcamp or in the physical form at the Warren merchandise stall at local festivals.

A band I can’t get enough of is Storms from London, and they’ve recently released my favourite of their tracks. ‘Shame’ is a fantastic tune, which starts directly on a high. George Runciman takes you on a journey of vocals, introducing the title of the song as he screams over the guitars, but then softening for the verses. The chorus is sung loudly as the guitars pick up and create a fantastically loud noise.

This track just does everything for me – it’s rough, it’s quick and yet has slow moment. I probably won’t be seeing these guys over the summer (a shame in itself, as they are awesome live), but I will definitely be playing this track in preparation for a good night out – it’s a great get-in-the-mood track from a very talented and fun band.

You can get this track free from their website (stormsband.com) as well as from the usual means: ITunes, Amazon, Google Play and Spotify.

Back to Humberside, on the other side of the water, The Finest Hour have released their new single ‘The Scrapheap’, available to buy from their Bandcamp.

Energetic punk folk, this band hit the nail on the head every time. Delivering a softly sung, guitar-heavy track, ‘Scrapheap’ is a song which we can all relate to. I don’t have much to say about this track, as I think it speaks volumes itself. If you haven’t already check out Cleethorpes-based The Finest Hour, I urge you to do so at the next opportunity.

And finally back to Hull. You may have seen Breeze performing at Humber Street Sesh, all clad in white and performing this song along with a selection of their best tracks.

New song ‘Sam Wave’ features a chorus which you’ll find stuck in your head for hours after playing it, with a tune which will keep you upbeat. It’s got a more summery sound to most of their other tracks, contrasting with the deep sultry voice of Aron Gilbey.

And with the video filmed locally, you can see just how beautiful this part of the country really is, on those days when the sun decides to shine.

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Teenage Cancer Trust Fundraiser

There were loads of events on this bank holiday weekend, but I’d had the tickets for the Teenage Cancer Trust Fundraiser on my noticeboard for over a month.

At a mere £3.50, I couldn’t turn this event down. Even with a free gig on at the Larkin’s Ale Festival, I knew I would be spending the majority of Sunday with my friends and fellow muso’s down at Fruit. Afterall, it was for a good cause and twelve bands had also given up their time to entertain us free, all for this charity. A charity which Luke Bowe pointed out was of equal significance to all in the audience as “we’ve all been touched by the Big C”.

Wayward Suns
Wayward Suns

Wayward Suns kicked things off. They’re a band of young lads, who I haven’t seen perform before. Their heavy rock sound filled the room, where quite a crowd had gathered. New to me, I noticed a similar thread to their sound as I hear in Young Jack (especially with songs such as ‘Get Along’). Sharing their vocal harmonies across the three lads at the front of the stage, the lead vocalist – who also has a mop of hair similar to Luke Bowe – had a voice which reminds me of Counting Crows’ Adam Duritz; melodic and raw.

Vulgarians lead singer Ryan Wilson-Preen
Vulgarians lead singer Ryan Wilson-Preen

Due to the scattering crowd, and the sudden sunshine, Vulgarians commented on the lack of people inside Fruit for their set. “We’ve emptied Fruit,” Ryan Wilson-Preen announced; I hadn’t even noticed until he mentioned it, but it was true that the crowd was more disperse. A shame, and rather a shock, as this band have built quite a following.

The gig was a near-sell-out and yet the venue never felt full; people came and went for the bands they knew and supported, with few sticking around for the duration. No single band had the full impact of the crowd because of this, and I felt this was a real shame.

The Froot '67
The Froot ’67

Looking rather 70s and sounding a little 60s, The Froot ’67 were exactly what I wanted to listen to on a sunny Sunday afternoon. I am most certainly one of their newest fans, will no doubt be purchasing their debut album ‘Seven Past Eight’, for which they celebrated on the 9th at Raine Club. Bouncing vocals from bassist Stevie Newby to guitarist Louie Donoghue, all four members performed with huge levels of energy. A real delight.

It was at this point that my friend and I nipped out for a spot of late lunch, missing Attack The Embassy. However, our return was quick, eager to not miss too much, and we re-entered to the loud noise and incredible power of Cannibal Animal – whose drummer had us both transfixed as he performed in a blur of swift movements – and Dead Hormones who are the band I have seen most recently. We were straight back into the swing of things, and ready for the night to continue, replenished and excited.

Dead Hormones
Dead Hormones

The line-up from this point featured some of my favourite Hull bands; those I rave, unashamedly, rather too much about. My friend and I settled into a spot before the stage, digging our heels into the concrete floor.

Tom Skelly has a stunning voice, and I am always amazed at the ferocity with which he and his Salty Beards perform. Much like the ocean and the allure as described in popular track ‘Morning Sun’, their music sweeps over you, a never-ending wave of sound, rising and dipping to cool you with Skelly’s softer tones.

BREEZE lead vocalist Aron Gilbey
BREEZE lead vocalist Aron Gilbey

Breeze, Streaming Lights, Coaves and Young Jack never get old for me. Eternally indulgent, I could write reams just about their sets.  From the point where Breeze sang ‘Goodbye, So Long’, I was my most energetic, and mirrored the vivacity of Coaves and the highlight of silliness, Streaming Lights, who always offer more entertainment than their electric tunes.

Streaming Lights
Streaming Lights

As a prelude to the final three bands, we also had experimental The Bodyfarmers, who perform with no vocals. Their mixture of guitars – during one song being played with a bow – drums and soundboard filled the space wonderfully. It can sometimes cause people’s minds to wander, having no lyrics to focus on or sing along to, but The Bodyfarmers seemed to have the opposite effect, pulling the crowd in. Their last track appeared to knock out each of the guitarists, who fell to the floor and left the stage to the drummer and bassist, who thanked the audience in an echoing quiet (with no use for them, the mics had been turned off).

The Bodyfarmers
The Bodyfarmers

Young Jack had a hefty crowd, with people moving further forward to welcome them on stage. Playing their popular tracks as well as new funky sound ‘Move’, they were the ideal headliners; indeed taking their second headline spot this week. So enthralled were the audience, we called out for more, and reacted very positively to their cover of Wild Cherry’s ‘Play That Funky Music’.

Young Jack lead vocalist Luke Bowe
Young Jack lead vocalist Luke Bowe

Overall, a very enjoyable way to spend the day – absorbed in the music which stretched from bright sunshine to the glittering night. And though the crowd altered as quickly as the bands did, there was always a buzz in the room. Taking that into consideration alongside the £500 raised for charity, you can’t argue that the event was a hit.

And a perfect warm-up to the festival season, when we’ll be able to soak up the tunes as well as those sunny rays.