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Humber Street Sesh – The Unorganised Chaos Formula

So, tomorrow is the first day of August and I’ve realised two things. One, I haven’t been successful at keeping the blog busy this year. City of Culture, I have struggled to balance you with work. And two, Humber Street Sesh is this weekend!

As with every year, my best friend is moving herself North for the weekend of Sesh. We literally only plan that one day. But so busy have we both been that this year we haven’t really found the time for even that. So, instead of my usual organised band-by-band what you should see preview, here’s my plan on ‘winging it’.

I’m usually one of those people who can write up a plan months before an event, especially something like HSS which I look forward to for most of the year (I bought my tickets on October). But when you overly plan things, it is more likely that something won’t happen. Last year, what happened was standing in front of the main stage waiting for one of my favourite bands, only for them not to go on. I could see the lead singer, I watched the lead singer waiting, waiting, waiting…

Streaming Lights - Steve & Ryan
Festival Faves, Streaming Lights

The band subsequently announced that they were no longer a band the following month.

The moral: winging it means no heartbreak. I don’t plan to see much, so I can’t be upset if I don’t see certain elements. I can simply blame the Unorganised Chaos Formula.

So, this is how it works. We turn up on the day with three acts on the Must See List. THREE. One headliner and two other acts.

Disclaimer: I will miss out on amazing acts that I would love to see. I will feel disappointed at this. I will bump into a bandmember I am friendly with and feel devastated that we missed their act. But I will simply say, “We’re winging it this year” and all will be fine.

To decide on my Must See List of three, I have to consider the bands which a) we both love and adore, and b) will ensure we are not disappointed.

So, start with the headliner. This is a lot harder than it sounds, because this year there are four headliners that I love and adore. They are The Quicksilver Kings (Speak Easy stage), Fire (The Unstoppable Force) (Strummerville Stage – many brackets), LIFE (Main Stage – and totally deserving, because they’ve had an epic year), and finally, Counting Coins (Fruit 2 stage). Thankfully, my lovely bestie helps with this decision. If I ask her which Hull band she wishes to see, especially at 10pm when we’ve spent twelve hours watching bands, she will say two words: Counting Coins.

Counting Coins
Counting Coins from a previous HSS (when I didn’t have a great camera)

We will be at the Fruit 2 stage at about 9:45pm and we will dance our tired feet off, doing a little salsa when necessary, and singing to our broken throats content. Because that is what the lady wants, and it’s actually been a whole year since either of us have seen them live.

That leave two Must See acts for my list.

First on the list, performing at 3pm on the Fringe Stage, I’ve selected Loudhailer Electric Company. I’ve seen them perform a few times at Kardomah94 but never on an outdoor stage, so it’d be fantastic to see them in that different setting. They’re loud, they’re funky, they’re amazing performers and songwriters. And the bestie hasn’t seen this band perform, so it’ll be good to introduce her to something new.

Loudhailer Electric Company Paul Newbon
Loudhailer performing at K94 (photo credit to Paul Newbon)

The last of my Must See is a little tricky. I had two bands in mind for the last slot. The Mighty and Moon are fantastic and now perform with the addition of the amazing Emma Fee. I haven’t seen them perform with this line-up of musicians, and I’ve just built up this beautiful image in my mind of how they’ll sound. But there’s one band that’s always on my Must See List, and they’re playing at the same time. Mighty and the Moon are on the Main Stage at 1:55pm, and Streaming Lights are on the Fruit 2 stage at 2pm. It’s no argument: Streaming Lights are my festival favourite, they’ve not played for ages due to various reasons, and I just know that it’ll be a set which either meets my expectations of wonderfully blows them out of the water.

So, my Must See List is 2pm Streaming Lights, 3pm Loudhailer Electric Company, and my headliner is Counting Coins.

Aside from that, we’re planning to wander relatively aimlessly around the 14 stages.

hss app

And to help with the Unorganised Chaos Formula, there’s the addition of a Humber Street Sesh app this year! It’s got an hour-by-hour guide to the line-up across all stages. There’s a map so you can see where everything is (including the Caffe Gelato stand!). And it’s going to be the most up-to-date way of finding out what’s on.

You can download the app onto the usual platforms – just search for Humber Street Sesh in whichever app store you use.

In fact, with the app in my pocket, all I really need to plan is my festival outfit.

 

If you haven’t been organised enough to sort out tickets yet then you can pick them up at a range of stores across Hull. Go to the festival’s website for a full list: http://www.humberstreetsesh.co.uk/tickets/

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Humber Street Sesh – Decisions to be made…

Next weekend, on the first day of August, Hull Marina will be taken over by Humber Street Sesh. And with over 180 acts across twelve stages, how are you possibly going to plan your day and get to see everything?

If you’re me, and you’ve worked with several of these artists, you’re in a losing situation: there’s going to be a clash somewhere. But if you don’t have that issue, and you’re just out to soak up as many acts as possible, you may still consider planning your day beforehand.

I’m not saying that to make the most of HSS, you have to plan. No way! By all means, wandering rather aimlessly is a fantastic way to come across a diverse range of bands, solo singers and artists of all shades. By all means, discard the map, let your feet make the decisions. I’ve stumbled across some amazing bands this way: Streaming Lights, King No-One, LIFE

But, if you’re a little bit like me, then you’ll want to plan out at least some of the day.

Stages list
Stages list (click to enlarge)

So, my first suggestion is that you pick a genre. Let’s say you just want to see guitar-fuelled indie rock. It’s a popular genre for festivals. And Hull has loads of such performers. You’re going to want to start at the Hull College Group Newcomers Stage, with The Magdalenes kicking things off at 11:40. Stick around for a couple more acts – maybe have a picnic in front of the stage – because The Shed Club and Office Party are well worth your time. They’ll be the perfect indie warm up. Next, I’d advise the Alternative Main Stage: to be honest, to cover the sub-genres of indie, you want this to be your comfort zone of the festival. At 3pm, you’ve got BREEZE followed by Audio Subscene and Affairs. For the evening selection, head over to the Green Bricks Stage, where Rebel Sell perform at 5:30, followed by Magic Carpet Factory; two fantastic bands, who I certainly aim to see. You want to settle yourself here, or end up back at the Alternative Main Stage for the duration of the evening, taking in either headliners Age of Atlas or Black Delta Movement.

Stages list
Stages list (click to enlarge)

My second suggestion is pot luck. Pre-prepared pot luck. The danger here is that you could end up running from each stage throughout the day, therefore tiring your feet out more than needed and being unable to dance as much you may want to. However, if you take out the stages which really don’t interest you – genre-wise – then at least you know that each selection is likely to please. Pick a time and then pull a stage out of a hat. You could start off with a Break Dance Workshop at the Sesh Urban Quarter, taking in the fringe options at Corn Exchange with Mr Sneaks, and ending up at the Newcomers Stage with Coaves.

Third option: build the noise. Start off mellow, and meander the stages until you’re fuelled with a heavy, loud sound. Test all genres, and see a full range of acts. You could start at the Acoustic Marquee with Mark Rowland and The Dyr Sister, two fabulous storytellers. Then try out the Speak Easy Stage, with the charming Neil Thomas and Will and Holly (Little Weather) who are on at 3:40. Then check out the Newcomers Stage with the last performance from Babies followed by Fronteers. You’ll want to head off at this point, as Cannibal Animal follow – too loud and energetic for just yet – over to the Dead Bod Stage for the full band Crooked Weather and Quicksilver Kings. By this point, it’ll be turning to night-time and you’ll be up for a dance. You could stick around here, because the next few bands are a lot of fun, but for more noise you want to be heading over to the Alternative Main Stage for La Bête Blooms. You can pick a genre for the end of the night, deciding on the one which best suits your mood: Ska at the University of Hull Main Stage with The Talks, featuring Neville Staple; the Fruit Stage for some hairy punk sounds from Ming City Rockers; or popular local metal artists at the Rock & Metal Warehouse with The Colour Line.

Silent Disco HSS2015
Silent Disco (click to enlarge)

You could plan your day based on the artists you know and love. As I say, this would cause major issues for me; mainly at 10pm when I’m ready to park myself in front of my chosen headliner. Coaves, a band I’ve done loads of work with and who have the perfect summer sound, are taking over the Newcomers Stage. The Finest Hour, hailing from over the bridge, are at Corn Exchange. Danny Landau Band, another funky summer sound, are on the Dead Bod Stage. I might even decide to support my editor at Browse in the Silent Disco tent. But then there’d be the Black Delta Movement versus The Talks argument I’ve been having since I first saw the line-up, as they take to the Main and Alternative Main Stages.

Fact is, there is no perfect plan. Because on top of the music, there’s art, there’s activities for the kids, there’s generally just bumping into friends and socialising. So perhaps the wandering aimlessly option is perfectly valid.

That, or you select no more than five acts – allowing both an element of organisation and the freedom to find new and wonderful acts unseen at previous festivals. If you do this, I can highly suggest stopping at the Youth Stage, where you’ll find Yasmin Coe headlining at 8:30pm (an early night for the young performers) who is launching her single ‘Nothing Better’, collaborated with Endoflevelbaddie, at the festival.

Whatever your plan of action, the day aims to be fantastic. A family festival for the people by the people of Hull.

See you there.

Just in case you want to plan - a map of the area.
Just in case you want to plan – a map of the area. (click to enlarge)

A Busy Day in Hull City Centre (20.06.2015)

I knew it was going to busy day, especially after a reduced sleep post-gig. It’s always busy in the city centre on a Saturday. But this was more than your average Saturday.

First of all it was the Lord Mayor’s Parade, an annual event with a ‘green’ parade walking one mile around the Princes Quay and Old Town section. This year the theme was ‘Hats Off To The Mayor’, with a competition open to the public to make their own hat.

Up until last year, I had been a part of the parade, walking with a local group of Rainbows. However, our unit has now disbanded and so I watched the groups of participants assemble along Princes Dock Street from the window of Cuckoos, where I ate a delicious lunch with a friend. A pirate ship (which my friend argued was inadequately entitled, as it held only two pirates) was parked directly outside our window, and we were able to see the range of costumes pass us by.

The Pirate 'Boat'
The Pirate ‘Boat’

Our lunch consumed, we headed to the bottom of Whitefriargate where Steel Trinity were positioned. They played music to onlookers awaiting their glimpse of the parade, which seemed to have timed itself perfectly with the heavens opening their bulbous clouds.

It didn’t dampen the spirits of any of the participants, even if it did affect the moods of some of the onlookers. There was dancing and singing, musical instruments and puppets, all joyfully playing to the crowds. Some costumes were very well designed for the troublesome British weather: umbrellas transformed into jellyfish and large hats designed to look like other creatures.

Underwater creatures getting a watering
Underwater creatures getting a watering

While all of this was taking place, there was a demonstration happening in Queens Gardens. An anti-austerity protest.

At 2pm, I headed over to The Warren, a resource centre which opens its doors to young people during weekdays. Saturday 2th June, however, the doors opened to the general public in order to host a special gig in partnership with the anti-austerity demonstration.

Hull Against Austerity gig poster

I entered as Joe Solo performed a song of revolution to a scattered crowd, some stood and some sat directly before the stage. He song further songs about protest – describing the mining strikes of 30 years ago – and songs in protest – one about a friend who was arrested for setting up a soup kitchen in a disused building. For his song ‘No Pasarán’, he had the crowd get involved. A song about a Hull volunteer who fought against fascists in the Spanish Civil War, the title means ‘They shall not pass’, and when this line was sung during the chorus we were invited to join in, producing a tuneful chant. “It sounds better with your fist in the air,” he told us, highlighting the need for strength in numbers but also representing the non-violent approach to this protest.

He also took time to promote the We Shall Overcome events which, similar to this gig, have no monetary ticket prices. Instead you are invited to bring along donations of tinned and dried foods for the local food banks. A positive reaction to the recent election results, there will be a series of events over the weekend of October 2nd-4th across the country, celebrating music and culture while supporting those affected by the cuts. This was met by the loudest applause of the gig, showing further the solidarity in those gathered.

Next onto the stage was the manager of the Warren with a few words about austerity and how his organisation fits into this. He opened with strong words: “the whole theory of austerity is bullshit.” He stated that it was fantastic to see so many people, young and older, at both the demonstration and the gig, explaining that this is “your future… this is where it begins again” and that we needed to “get angry in a controlled and measured and campaigning way” because “that’s what scares them the most”.

Performers in Queen Victoria Square
Performers in Queen Victoria Square

Following him was 12 year-old Eva Davies with her original songs. Not a protest singer like Joe Solo, she was singing about those things which affect teenagers in Britain; opening with a re-telling of Romeo & Juliet did elude to the theme however. The point being made here is that opportunities such as this will become lessened if too many cuts take place. With so many volunteer-run organisations struggling and venues being strangled with legislation, there are fewer chances for someone like Eva to share her talent.

Nothing’s Happening were next onto the stage; a punk band full of political opinions. The crowd – all besides one very young boy who sat right up front – were on their feet for this act. Lead vocalist Casey Stead referred to another punk singer: Jon Lydon, better known as Jonny Rotten of the Sex Pistols, who has quoted in several newspapers for telling everyone to make sure they use their vote and calling Russell Brand a “bumhole” in response to his political “revolution” last October.

Fact: everyone is talking about austerity. Even if they don’t fully understand what it entails, or how it will directly impact them, the idea of it is absurd. Martin Deane, MP for the Green Party in Hull North, spoke further to that which he had said earlier in Queens Gardens at the demonstration. He declared that “austerity is a con” and that “we’re a city of culture, not a city of cuts!” With a view of cuts to libraries and hospitals, not to mention the way education is falling down the plughole of politics, he said that he encouraged everyone present to fight against austerity.

Last to the stage were popular Hull band, LIFE, with Stew Baxter taking to the drums as Rich is unable to perform at the moment. Starting off with their first single ‘Crawling’, they encapsulated the frustration many felt at the election results. Guitarist Mick Sanders declared, “I hope everyone stuck it to the man today,” before they launched into catchy tune ‘Money’ – during which Mez Sanders added to the lyrics “who even likes money anyway?”. Their set was one which could bring the crowds in – a popular local band who are making their name across the UK – but also one which demonstrated the power of political beliefs and in giving words to your opinions and emotions. They performed as they would any gig, but embedded in the lyrics are the political views of these young men living in a torn society.

Steel Trinity
Steel Trinity

It was a day to feel accomplished, and a day to feel a part of something. I do what I can for charity, supporting local organisations as I do local bands. I wanted to be there for my students and for the local community and for those who had come together to fight a worthy cause. I managed all of this, though I left feeling that in order to do so I was unable to give myself entirely to any in particular.

This is true of many things. Hull is so alive with activity that it is difficult to attend everything – support everything. But I do my bit, and I hope that others too did their bit on this busy Saturday in Hull city centre.

Festival Fever – New to Hull 2015

On Saturday 11th July, you will be able to enjoy live music and family fun in two locations. In one corner, there is West Park Party. And in the other, The Big Gig, held at the University Union. Naturally, there are pros and cons with both, but which one best suits you?

West Park Party poster

Let’s start with the first one to be announced, back in November. Organised by Auxilium Events Ltd, West Park Party declares itself as “a music festival for all the family”. There is going to be one main stage, with a range of acts considered Heritage, Current and Local. Current Acts which have so far been announced are Labrinth, Union J (who were at the Launch Party in Princes Quay in February) and Ella Eyre: a rather diverse collection on offer. Heritage Acts currently announced include Sinitta (who is also helping organise the festival), Toploader (who headlined at Trinity Festival 2014), and Aswad. Local artists Emma King, Chiedu Oraka, Emmie Craft and Nineties Boy are also on the bill. A true mixture of genres. However, there are still acts to be announced.

Front page of flyer

The Big Gig, the first festival from local events organiser Hull Red, have given a line-up of eleven local acts, including headliner Endoflevelbaddie and the ever-popular Young Jack. The aim of this stage is to get your feet dancing, but there will also be an acoustic stage with a range of folk acts, well known and new to the scene, offering a full variety of genres.

Also pegged as “family friendly”, The Big Gig has a focus on those with learning disabilities. Red have been putting on disability friendly events for some time, on a smaller scale, and are now confident that they can produce a festival designed with these specific needs in mind. The aim is to get people together; making the area both accessible and comfortable for people with learning disabilities, while providing a fun day out for families and fans of the local music industry.

Big Gig - line up

West Park Party is also considering those who often find festivals inaccessible. They have “a whole area” specifically designed to ensure access for disabled people. They are also linked with several local charities, including Cash4Kids and Dove House Hospice, who are working with the organisers.

Families can enjoy themselves at both festivals.

At West Park Party there is a Familyzone, defined as “an area where kids can play and adults can relax” in earshot of the bands, so as not to miss anything. In this zone there will be the usual festival fun, including a marine life zone, shows from local drama groups and an arts and crafts area. The young ones will have no reason to say they are bored.

So, too, at The Big Gig, who will also have children’s entertainers and arts and crafts, alongside story tellers, dance workshops, graffiti art and bubble shows. Something for everyone and every taste.

It’s difficult for me not to be biased about this one. The family friendly activities are not at the forefront of my mind when selecting a festival, though I do attend quite a few with friends and their little ones. And, as much as I want to see international selling artists and those ‘big’ acts from around the world coming to Hull, I love the local scene. Having attended the launch party for West Park Party, I can see why people are talking about it on a grander scale than they are about The Big Gig. But, with most of this talk still seemingly hanging on Union J, I just can’t get as excited.

Give me a dose of Streaming Lights any day.

Besides, I haven’t told you about the main deciding factor for most families considering attending. Let us stereotype the two adults, two children which is often used in ticket sales. For The Big Gig, this will cost you a maximum of £20: that’s £6 per adult, and £4 per child over the age of 10 years. A family ticket for West Park Party is £70. Adults are priced at £30, with children over 5 years at £20, and “new age pensioners” at £22.50. But remember, what you are getting for that cost.

Bottom line: both festivals aim to involve everyone, offering a range of opportunities and experiences for the community. What sways your decision should be which acts you want to see. You may have seen Counting Coins and The Hubbards perform numerous times, whereas you’ve never seen Ella Eyre, who has also been announced as part of the West Park Party line-up. You may want the comfort of knowing that you will enjoy the day if you see the bands you see regularly – for many with learning disabilities, familiarity is essential, and so this is ideal. You may decide to kick off the festival season with something different.

Your reasons for attending one over the other are individual. This is a snapshot of the pros and cons of each. All I can advise is that you are there at one of them. Start the festival season as you wish.

Tickets for West Park Party are available online or over the ticket hotline on 0800 689 3016

Tickets for The Big Gig are available through Hull Box Office.

Humber Street Sesh 2015 – a preview

A very important announcement has been made this week. Humber Street Sesh wristbands went on sale Tuesday 21sy April.

At an advance price of £5, you’re getting a huge collection of music, art and local culture packed into the one day festival.

LIFE
LIFE

On Saturday 1st August, over 180 bands will play across ten stages. There will be over 50 DJ’s in the new Original Brew’s Art and Soul Warehouse as well as at the Resident Association Disco tent. So, musically, there is something for every taste.

Humber Street Sesh is a 12-hour showcase of the huge wealth of talent Hull has to offer. For those who engage with the weekly Sesh at The Polar Bear, you get to see your favourite local bands up on the bigger stages, mingling with even more like-minded people. For those who can’t always get down on a Tuesday night, this is your chance to support those acts. And yet there is so much more besides this.

A new addition last year, returning to the Skate Park this year.
A new addition last year, returning to the Skate Park this year.

There will also be the usual markets, street food, live street art, children’s activities, comedy and cult cinema, in addition to breakdance and rap battles, a skate park, street theatre and much more. After last year’s brief downpour, there is the aim to have more sheltered bar areas this year. Not that the rain stopped many of us from finishing our drink or heading down to see  our favourite bands who happened to perform at that point.

Under 12s go free (collect your wristband as you enter the gates), and so this truly is a festival for the people; regardless of age or taste, you’ll have a fantastic day.

Streaming Lights
Streaming Lights

 

With 40’000 attending last year, we know we can get more through those gates this time.

Tickets are available from Hull Box Office or by phoning 01482 221113, and will be sold in various locations across the city at later dates. Note, a booking fee will apply.

Humber Street Sesh info poster

All photographs are by Paul Newbon, taken at last year’s HSS. 

Independent Venue Week

A week of celebrations for those small music venues around the UK, and a nod to the people who run them. Week in, week out these venues offer local artists the chance to experience playing live in front of a varied audience, as well as inviting those from further afield.

From Monday 26th January – Sunday 1st of February, venues across the UK will be hosting an eclectic mixture of the talent which has graced their stages as part of Independent Venue Week. Stewart Baxter, of Warren Records, pointed out that “January is always quiet month for all businesses and a time when these venues struggle so IVW helps highlight these places, bring in big acts and put a spotlight on places like the Adelphi.”

Hull bands always refer back to their times at the Adelphi, the iconic venue situated on De Grey Street, which kicks off their celebrations with a reminder of their 30th birthday shenanigans. On Sunday 25th, they will be showing a film premiere of the Live performance of the Kaiser Chiefs gig from November for members of the club.

Adelphi IVW poster

With events following each night of the week, there is a collection of talent from Hull and beyond to pull the audience in. This is the key element of Independent Venue Week. At a quiet time of the year, audiences often forget to support their local acts. The Hull music scene is growing significantly, with an increasing number of venues. But for every new venue or band willing to play, they need the audience to follow and support them. The summer festivals pull in huge crowds, but it is the weekly nights and small venues outside of the city centre which need your support throughout the year. Stewart added that “These places are responsible for every live act you see today, everyone started at a local venue, and without their support and belief in new music we wouldn’t have any of it. So it’s important to remember where it all starts, to support these bands now knowing that many of them will go on to greater things and we have helped them get there.”

#madeinhull poster

On Tuesday there is something different on the cards. #MadeinHull will see 10 bands on the stage, playing the instruments which have been set up for them. Selected at random on the night, each of these bands will then have the chance to perform a couple of songs to the crowd who gather. No messing about, simply get up and play when your name is called out. For the small price of £2, a night of opportunities.

On Thursday, US bands The Weeks and The Apache Relay, grace the stage, alongside Hull’s own Young Jack. This one is expected to bring in a huge crowd, after their last visit to the Adelphi was sold out.

On Friday, Fruit is hosting Summat Good, featurin Paris XY, Oedipus The King and T.G.L.D for a night of music and art, as the art collective Something Entirely Different produce work around the venue. A reminder that Hull boasts not only its growing music scene, but also the art scene as well.

frankie & heartstrings gig poster

Back at Adelphi, Saturday night sees Sunderland band Frankie & The Heartstrings perform, with support from the fantastic LIFE and new band Vulgarians. Their music described as “the terrible truth for the creative freaks”, they have an energetic sound, which I assure you will you on your feet and moving around the room. A fantastic line-up.

Concluding on Sunday with Lach reading from his debut book of poetry, ‘The Thin Book of Poems’. Described as “a face-ache funny, beat-punk-unplugged joy” by The Guardian and “a gruff-and-tough punk turned poet with a heart of gold” by Timeout New York, this night, with support from The Pub Corner Poets, offers a relaxed, humorous adventure.

Don’t let the January chill keep you at home this week. Even if you can only spare the one evening to support our local venues, ensure you get down to either The New Adelphi Club or Fruit. With such a collection of artists available, there’s something to entice everyone.

New Year’s Eve in Hull

Still got no idea what you’re doing for New Years? With only just over a week to go, you need to be considering which ticket offers you the most for your money. Which event will offer you with the most explosive entry into 2015?

Here are the best three offers I could find, grouped together for your convenience.

Pros and Cons… well, there’s always a few of them.

Option #1: NYE at The Polar Bear

Polar Bear

With the Onion Club creating a mixed set of funk, jazz and soul, hosts of the weekly Sesh are proposing a very entertaining night. Resident DJs, if you’ve been to one of the events before, you’ll know it’s a funky night of vintage and sounds and music which gets you into a funky groove.

Pro: this is the cheapest of the nights out. Tickets are a mere fiver, which includes a free glass of fizz, and drinks at The Polar Bear are not overpriced. You can pick them up from the bar.

Con: no live music.

Option #2: Frootenanny

Frootenanny

A fabulous wordplay in the popular Hootenanny celebrations of New Year’s Eve, I was instinctively drawn in. Add to that a fantastic line-up and the ability to walk to and from the venue (perhaps not a pro for yourselves, but certainly for me), and I’ll struggle to find a con.

An 18+ event which features a mixture of musical sounds, there’s something for everyone. A mash-up of easy listening from Joe Duncan and band, pop-rap from popular Nineties Boy, indie guitar tunes from The Holy Orders, punk-based ska from the electrifying Counting Coins, all topped off with a DJ set from the amazing Endoflevelbaddie.

Pro: so many amazing acts for a wonderful £6 (advance tickets are available from Hull Box Office).

Con: When really busy, Fruit can get a bit too much for me. People can just be too rude for such confined spaces. And I don’t want to see the New Year in covered in someone else’s booze and wishing to punch everyone who finds the need to walk between every conversation I’m having. Don’t get me wrong, I love the venue and I’ve never been disappointed at a gig there, but I do get frustrated with a significant amount of people who attend.

 

Option #3: Browse Mag Sessions #2: NYE

Browse Mag Sessions

Okay, okay, so it’s kind of obvious which of the three options I have offered you, I will be attending. But, hear me out.

The second instalment from Browse Magazine sees two bands and six DJs, offering a full bag of treats. Audio Subscene are headlining with Fronteers supporting: both offering indie tunes, one band quite new to the scene while the other has a secure following.

With six DJs, including a set from our charming editor Mike White, there will be music until 4 in the morning. Most exciting though, is the exclusive set from Steve Cobby, of Fila Brazillia fame. Truly a star-studded collection of local musicians.

A little more pricey than the other events – £7 for advance tickets available from here or £10 otd – we are offering a huge selection.

Pro: the platter of goodies I’ve already mentioned – which also features DJs Mike White, Tom Gibbins, Phil Green, Corey Barker and Alex Robinson.

Con: A few people have commented that they’d prefer 6 bands and 2 DJs. Initially, I agreed, but the DJs we have lined up are fantastic, and will ensure an energetic night of great music from Hull and beyond.

And finally, a few reminders.

Wherever you choose to spend New Year’s Eve, drink safely and consider those around you. Prebook that taxi and ensure nobody is left out in the cold. Remember, the way you start the year sets the year in motion!

Happy partying people.

Black Delta Movement Single Launch 29.12.14

Though Black Delta Movement have existed for about 5 years, their sound is fresh to the ears. Poetic lyrics and powerfully mesmerising instrumentals, they slip into a mash of sub-genres: psychedelic rock, indie, garage, blues. It’s what makes them stand out from the crowd, as well as drawing people in.

Humber Street Sesh 2014
Humber Street Sesh 2014

2014 has been a busy year for the band. Signed with Ruby Music, they released their four-track EP ‘Ghost Dance’ in December, and the year will come to a conclusion with their single launch of “The Trip”.

A cover of Kim Fowley’s hit, originally written and produced in 1965, this song describes a psychedelic experience. A fast-paced, guitar-lead track, which encompasses the highs and lows of the 1970s: just as you drift off into the blissful instrumental, Matt Burr’s vocals slice through the instruments like a knife made of glass – the devil twisting your mind.

Fowley was once described as “a shadowy cult figure well outside the margins of the mainstream.” This too reflects the charismatic Black Delta Movement, who produce a sound on the outskirts of the indie music spectrum, delivering a different performance with each song. Though there are clear similarities to the original track, this is still very much their own composition.

And with support from Fire: The Unstoppable Force and The Evil Litter, the night is sure to be a cacophony of bizarre wonderment.

Advance tickets are £5, available from bandmembers with a limited amount at The Polar Bear. Doors open at 7:30, and an aftershow party will continue til 2am with a DIG Club Night/BDM DJ set.

An ideal way to let go after eating all those mince pies.

 

BDM single launch banner

TONIGHT: Awayke event

AWAYKE presents Paris XY / Copenhagen / Dyr Sister / Zach Walker

AWAYKE poster

Awaken your senses at The New Adelphi Club on Saturday, 13th December. Alongside the tantalising sounds of Paris XY, Copenhagen and Dyr Sister, you will be treated to Cynamatic Projections from Zach Walker. A feast for the ears and eyes: music, arts and crafted electric vibes.

Paris XY are a duo made up of Alice Smith and James Orvis. With dark poetic lyrics and a sound influenced by Joy Division, Radiohead, Trentemøller and The Knife, they have developed a unique sound which pushes the boundaries of electronic music.

Their recently released single, Wytching Hour, is a disturbing depiction of the everyday man, which sets the listener on a journey to discover truth in the dark view of modern society.

Copenhagen took their name from the road in which they rehearse, in the centre of an industrial estate in Hull. The band consists of Kurt Gurnell, Gareth Mills, Stuart Bichanan and Owen Garbutt. With influences from early to mid-period Verve and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, blended with contemporary The Horrors, these guys produce anthems of melodious, psychedelic rock.

The Dyr Sister on the cover of Browse Magazine
The Dyr Sister on the cover of Browse Magazine

The Dyr Sister is a one-woman band consisting of Sally Currie. Writing and performing her music entirely live, she blends the sounds of her melodic vocals, classical instruments and whatever she pulls from her treasure chest into a delight for the ears. Mixing influences from folk, jungle and dubstep, she refuses to let a genre define her.

Zach Walker creates live visual performances using original filmed content that he mixes with the live Organic Electronics technique. From Seattle, he lived and studied in Hull for a number of years before moving to London to hone his craft through visual art. He’s spent years lighting up festivals and events, such as Glastonbury, producing a projected video installation piece on the outside of the MSRI building, and another piece which premiered in the fine art setting forming a significant part of the recent Reeps One ADO Exhibition, as featured on the BBC London News.

Recently, he has established Make.AMPLIFY with award-winning dance artist Jennifer Irons. Using a mixture of art, movement and innovative digital technology, they reveal all that is hidden, ignored, discarded and forgotten, inspiring people and creating meaningful experiences for their many audiences.

This event promises to amaze, delight and inspire, offering more than your Saturday night. Doors open at 8pm. Tickets are £6 otd.

Preview originally written for Browse Magazine