Music Memories: Soundtracks

On Thursday, I was sat in one of the 600 cinemas across Europe showing The Rocky Horror Show Live. And, sadly, time has passed with not a moment to write about it. I have talked about it at length with friends and colleagues, but have not had the chance to review it.

So instead, I shall place it as number one on my list of favoured soundtracks from my youth. It would be up in the top five regardless, though perhaps not taking the top spot. Still, it is worthy of a top spot here and there.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

I don’t recall how old I was when I first watched the film, but I imagine it was at home with my parents. They were not against us watching controversial shows. However, I know I had watched it several times before my twelfth birthday, as that summer my family – my mother, brother and I – dressed as transvestites for our local carnival. The sports club in which my parents worked had a float in the parade every year and had a bit of a reputation for being the loudest of them all.

My brother and I loved the parade, watching those in the darts team dressing up and dancing down the street. And that year was one we would never forget. I remember wearing a lycra top which was utterly inappropriate in any other setting, and I recall seeing far too much of one of my older friends who dressed in his mother’s lingerie to assume the role of Frank-N-Furter.

Safe to say, we were a hit with the locals. So much so that for the next few years there was always a Rocky float trying to achieve the reaction we had (I am sure they failed; as far as we were concerned, we were always the talk of the town).

I didn’t see the stage production until a couple of years ago, when Rhydian performed as Rocky, so sitting in the cinema was only my second live production. And it was amazing to see Richard O’Brien as part of it.

I’ve decided that, although Tim Curry will always be the shining star of the beautiful men who have played that iconic role, David Bedellla is taking up a close second.  As soon as he comes on stage, your eyes are drawn to his lips, large and glittery and one aspect of the most beautifully wicked smile!

My favourite character however, has always been Eddie. How could he not be when played by the wonderful Meat Loaf who so punctuated my childhood with his stunning ballads. When everyone else was singing Time Warp, I was singing Hot Patootie. So, here’s Hot Patootie:

The Last Unicorn

A classic of the 80s, The Last Unicorn was produced by some of those who went on to work for Studio Ghibli. The soundtrack is by America and is one of the most beautiful soundtracks I have ever heard.

This film was one of the go-to films for our babysitters, knowing that we would be drawn into the story for the full length of the film.

It is one which reminds me of the innocence of childhood, one which takes me back to that time when your dreams were as real as they could be. And I am still often glued to my seat for the entire film even though I’ve watched it many dozens of times.

Labyrinth

I don’t think there’s a child of the late 80s – early 90s who hasn’t seen this movie, and who hasn’t felt that David Bowie’s package wasn’t a significant aspect of their youth.

I loved David Bowie’s music, my mum being a fan (much of my early music taste was based on my mother’s). And I loved his portrayal of the Goblin King in the movie, developing quite the imaginary love affair. I don’t recall performing the role of Snow White or Sleeping Beauty, waiting for my prince to come and rescue me with a kiss. As a child, I opted to replace the character of Sarah Williams with my own personality. I wanted to meet strange creatures and dance in a giant dress at a masked ball. I loved the magic of it, as well as the music.

The Lion King

As I am sat writing this, The Lion King is playing in the background. Adka (who I introduced in my – our – review of The Big Gig) is a big fan of ‘Baby Lions’ and so we are watching it at least once a day at the moment.

I was 8 when it first came out, but did not become attached to this film until 2001 when my youngest brother was a year old. Just as with Adka, putting this film on would both pacify and entertain my brother for almost an hour and half. We would sing the songs together and dance to Hakuna Matata.

Whenever I think of my brother as a young baby, I think of Lion King. Before he was interested in football or Minecraft, this was his ecstasy.  And it was my ecstasy too, for I loved to see him happy.

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