Manic Street Preachers: 20 years of The Holy Bible

An album which signalled beginning and an end for the Manic Street Preachers, it is dark, emotional and beautiful.
The title I have given this blog is a little imprecise: the album is 20 years old, but it’s only been a part of my life for about 12 years. It was not my Holy Bible, but the band were the closest I had come to a feeling of divinity. The spirit of Richey James Edward’s lyrics sung by the glorious James Dean Bradfield, was enough to have a teenage me seeing a chance at heaven.

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The Manics were, and still are in a more ghostly manner, all-encompassing in my life. I no longer sit for hours surrounded by their paraphernalia, drowning in their lyrics, as I did at eleven, when This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours sought me out and took hold of my heart. They have become so much a part of me, that I do not need such a direct connection with them. My first tattoo was of my favourite song, emblazoned forever on my back, and just as with this tattoo I often find I catch a glimpse in the mirror and for a moment realise I have almost forgotten that it was there. I know it is there, but it’s been so long since I glanced at my own spine. Yet, knowing they are there means even when I forget, I am not removed from them.

The Holy Bible was their third studio album, released on the 29th August 1994. As with the Manics themselves, this album was attacked by the majority as a morbid collection of monstrosities and self-indulgence, and cherished by the minority who saw it as a series of screams in both pain and sheer pleasure. The band had stated that they felt they were drifting away from themselves, becoming too stereotypically Rock. And so this album came with a somewhat different sound to the previous Gold Against The Soul and allowed lyricists Richey and Nicky Wire to delve into their very souls and musicians James and Sean to lift them up with a hefty platform.

Six months after its release, Richey checked out of the Embassy Hotel on the day the band were due to set off for a US tour. Two weeks later his car was found on the Severn Bridge, abandoned, and since Richey James Edwards has been a memory and the occasional sighting by a possibly overly-ambitious fan.

Yet Richey’s spirit is still very much alive. He is remembered by all Manics fans, even those – like myself – who never truly knew the band of as a four-piece, through consistent questioning by interviewers and the use of his lyrics in later albums. James, Sean and Nicky have never accepted closure and his family turned down the option to declare him “legally dead” in 2002, instead allowing the term “presumed dead” later in 2008.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/emp/embed/smpEmbed.html?playlist=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bbc.co.uk%2Fiplayer%2Fplaylist%2Fp0276kbm&title=Mastertapes%3A%20Manic%20Street%20Preachers%20on%20returning%20to%20The%20Holy%20Bible&product=iplayer“>Mastertapes: Manic Street Preachers on returning to The Holy Bible


For me, The Holy Bible greeted me at a time when I was facing my own demons.

The lyrics rang out and stirred something new in me. I could fall asleep to the words one night and be haunted by them another. Any truth I found in the lyrics, frightened me. They are, after all, an insight into one very disturbed mind.

Yes hits home so many teenage realities. “I don’t know what I’m scared of or what I even enjoy” – fear was my enjoyment as a teenager. I started to face them and to run full pelt at them, with a desire to overcome and subdue all that terrified and haunted me. And what teenager doesn’t relate to the “11th commandment” of solitude? What teenager doesn’t question their identity and their place in the world?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA4st 7lb was a song which inspired my university dissertation – 13000 words on a topic I delved into with far too much enthusiasm. It disgusted and intrigued me, leading to a mixture of non-fiction and fiction work on the topics of mental disorders, anorexia in both male and female patients and thinspiration (something which deeply sickened me). Richey summed it all up so wonderfully and hideously: “this discipline’s so rare please applaud”.

But the song which strikes me the most, especially in hindsight, is Die in the Summertime. “the hole in my life stains even the soil” referred, in my view, to a growing emptiness I held as tightly as I could. The summer in which I purchased this album was one which changed my life forever, both the better and worse. It was the summer which changed me, and saw the end of my childhood and the beginning of my road to adulthood.

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For more news and tour dates for the Anniversary Tour visit http://www.manicstreetpreachers.com/home

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